Will Knicks’ Larry Johnson Be Penalized For Recent Remarks?

Social media can be a wild and delicate thing.

Of course, the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and etc., can be used to spread/share things like content, ideas, beliefs, views, and more, for better or for worse.

When someone is a public and/or notable figure, it’s important they be mindful of what they express on such platforms. As someone of notoriety, not only is one commonly known to set an example for those who look up to them, but they are also liable for such comments, and the rapid spread of social media allows the world to hold those very views against them.

It would appear as though former NBA player Larry Johnson would acknowledge that by now. So far, that hasn’t happened.

Last year, the former Knicks forward (who now works for New York as a basketball & business operations representative), expressed his views pertaining to gay athletes in an NBA locker room following Jason Collins coming out.

He tweeted that such a setting was no place for an individual of such an orientation, and that it would personally make him uncomfortable.

Fast forward to nearly exactly a year later, and Johnson took to Twitter to ensure his most recent beliefs (re: Donald Sterling’s comments) were heard again.

As a solution to such a controversial view, Johnson suggests having an all black league for players, executives, etc.

That doesn’t exactly appear to be the tolerable, accepting, and unified response those around NBA circles are likely looking to promote.

Not being able to recognize this, and seemingly suggesting further segregation and less unity, makes one equally as ignorant as Sterling, if not more.

Should the former sharpshooting UNLV product be penalized, fined, and/or removed from his position? It may be time, and though the Knicks may not move with great haste with such an ousting, perhaps the league will step in at this point given the severity of the firestorm Sterling’s comments have caused.

There can no be no such tolerance for any form of discrimination in the NBA.

Quantcast